A Brief History of the Occaneechi Band of the Saponi Nation

The Occaneechi Band of the Saponi Nation—OBSN for short—is a small Indian community located primarily in the old settlement of Little Texas, Pleasant Grove Township, Alamance County, North Carolina.

Until the middle part of the 20th century, the community was largely occupied in agricultural pursuits, sometimes supplemented by day wage labor jobs or jobs in nearby factories. In recent decades the numbers of people engaged full or part time in agriculture has declined significantly, and most working adults in the community now work in offices, or as skilled workers and craftsmen, or in the few remaining factories in the area.

The OBSN community is a lineal descendant of the Saponi and related Indians who occupied the Piedmont of North Carolina and Virginia in pre-contact times, and specifically of those Saponi and related Indians who formally became tributary to Virginia under the Treaties of Middle Plantation in 1677 and 1680, and, who under the subsequent treaty of 1713 with the Colony of Virginia agreed to join together as a single community. This confederation formed a settlement at Fort Christianna along the Virginia/North Carolina border in what is now Brunswick County, Virginia. The confederation included the Saponi proper, the Occaneechi, the Eno, the Tutelo, and elements of other related communities such as the Cheraw. All of these communities were remnants of much larger Siouan communities that had lived in North Carolina and Virginia in prehistoric times. Click here for more........

 

2014 Pow Wow Pictures - Click here!

 

 

OBSN BULLETIN BOARD

OBSN Celebrates Native American Month

MEETINGS 

 Community  &

Notable News

 

 

Photos from the 19th Annual Native Heritage Celebration - Many thanks to the tribes and the NC Musuem of History for honoring native cultural and the tribe of NC. 

 OBSN

Tribal Council Meeting

No Dec. Meeting

1/8/15 - Thursday

6:30pm

Tribal  Grounds 

Click here for directions 

4902 Daily Store Rd.

Burlington, NC 27217 

As we are enjoying family and giving thanks for all our blessings today, please take note of the historical inaccuracy surrounding Thanksgiving Day. 

Actually, Native Americans have always given thanks for the bounty of the harvest, the sacrifice of the animals that provide us with food, clothes and many tools to enhance the quality of life and most importantly the land in which provides us with all we need. Powwows, dances, prayers of thanks to the Creator are the many ways that native people express gratitude for our blessings. So please take a moment to not only give thanks today but to remember the many native lives that were unnecessarily taken in the name of "Thanksgiving". 

Thanksgiving a National Day of Native Mourning 

In 1620, Pilgrims arrived on the Mayflower naming the land Plymouth Rock. One fact that is always hidden is that the village was already named Patuxet and the Wampanoag Indians lived there for thousands of years. To many Americans, Plymouth Rock is a symbol. Sad but true many people assume, “It is the rock on which our nation began.” In 1621, Pilgrims did have a feast but it was not repeated years thereafter. So, it wasn’t the beginning of a Thanksgiving tradition nor did Pilgrims call it a Thanksgiving feast. Pilgrims perceived Indians in relation to the Devil and the only reason why they were invited to that feast was for the purpose of negotiating a treaty that would secure the lands for the Pilgrims. The reason why we have so many myths about Thanksgiving is that it is an invented tradition. It is based more on fiction than fact. 
 

 

http://www.republicoflakotah.com/2009/cooking-the-history-books-the-thanksgiving-massacre/

 

NATIONAL NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH

What is Native American Heritage Month and how to participate? 

   On August 3, 1990 President of the United States George H. W. Bush declared the month of November as National American Indian Heritage Month, thereafter commonly referred to as Native American Heritage Month.
        The Bill read in part that “the President has authorized and requested to call upon Federal, State and local Governments, groups and organizations and the people of the United States to observe such month with appropriate programs, ceremonies and activities”. This was a landmark Bill honoring America’s Tribal people.
       This commemorative month aims to provide a platform for native people in the United States of America to share their culture, traditions, music, crafts, dance, and ways and concepts of life. This gives native people the opportunity to express to their community, both city, county and state officials their concerns and solutions for building bridges of understanding and friendship in their local area.
         Federal Agencies are encouraged to provide educational programs for their employees regarding Native American history, rights, culture and contemporary issues, to better assist them in their jobs and for overall awareness.

source Wikipedia